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January's Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

January's Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

This year starts off on 10th January with a penumbral Lunar eclipse that will visible from start to finish from the UK.

  • The Moon rises ~1550h UT
  • The eclipse begins at ~1708h UT
  • The time of maximum eclipse is ~1910h UT
  • Eclipse ends at ~2112h UT

Although not as visually impressive as a total Lunar eclipse (where the Moon may turn blood-red like it did in January 2019), a penumbral eclipse is more "subtle", but is still a worthwhile sight for visual astronomers or astrophotographers.

For more information on the eclipse check out the links below:

https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/lunar/2020-january-10

https://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/advice/skills/how-observe-photograph-penumbral-lunar-eclipse/

Viewing the eclipse:

For viewing the eclipse your naked/unaided eye can be used. A pair of binoculars, such as the Celestron SkyMaster 15x70, are also ideal.

Celestron 15x70 SkyMaster

If you are using a telescope use a low power eyepiece, such as an Omni 40mm or 32mm to give you a wide field of view so the Moon's whole disc can be seen. 

Accessories for viewing and imaging the Lunar eclipse

Photographing the eclipse:

For those wanting to record this event there are a few ways you can do it:

NexYZ and smartphone: - this is a very simple and easy way of recording the event. Don't forget, you can use the NexYZ with binoculars, spotting scopes and of course telescopes. Read more about the NexYZ here.

DSLR Camera: to connect a DSLR to a telescope the connection part(s) needed depends on your telescope. However for all connection types you will need an appropriate T-ring. Celestron offer T-rings for the ever popular Canon and Nikon DSLR's. Baader Planetarium offer a range of T-rings for other DSLR brands and also for Mirrorless cameras too.

For connecting the T-ring (and your camera) to a telescope, where your telescope will act as a "telephoto lens":

We hope the sky will be clear for your location for you to be able to observe and/or image this celestial event. 

Good luck and clear skies! 

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